Agenda - Bosnia Agile Day 2016

From

To

 

Time (min)

8:00

8:55

Registration

55

Room

 Margaret Thatcher Auditorium

 

9:00

9:10

Welcome from Bosnia Agile

10

9:10

9:30

Speaker Brief Session Introduction

20

9:30

10:15

Complexity, context and collaboration from manufacturing software to creating a service relationship: Dave Snowden

45

10:15

10:30

Break and Networking

15

10:30

11:15

Let the Elephants Leave the Room: Tips for Making Development Life Leaner (M): Lemi Orhan Ergin

45

11:15

12:00

Effective meetings in Agile teams (I): Denis Rudonja

45

12:00

13:15

Lunch

75

Room

Margaret Thatcher Auditorium

King Salman  Auditorium

P12

 

 

13:15

 

 

14:00

 

From Agile Cat to Agile Tiger (M): Maria Ball and Joey Flint 

 

Agile Development - Why requirements matter (M): Fariz Saracevic

 

 

Workshop: User Story Mapping (M): Jason Jones

30

How to write effective requirements in an Agile environment (I)Matteo Taddei

30

14:00

14:45

Effective meetings for distributed teams (I)Marcus Degerman

Better User Stories (I): Matteo Cavucci

30

14:45

15:00

Break and Networking

15

15:00

15:45

Agile & Lean Movie Making (I): Utpal Chakraborty

Agile Testing - Adding values to agile teams: Adisa Sinanovic and Amela Teftedarija

 

Workshop: Building continuous improvement mindset with Improvement Theme (M): Jovan Vidic

45

15:45

16:30

10 tips how to make your Scrum fail - or succeed if you want (M)Igor Parac

Principles of continuous improvement and Agile retrospectives (M): Vedran Nikolic

45

16:30

16:45

Break and Networking

15

16:45

17:30

Agile in a Bank: From Pilot phase to Roll-out (M): Marco Trincardi

Always ready for release (M): Bogdan Costea

 

Unchaining the Analysts - making BDUF Scrum friendly (I): Amber Haley

45

17:30

18:00

Retrospective and Closing Notes Bosnia Agile

30

Legend

(I) - Introduction Level, (M) - Medium Level, (A) - Advanced Level

Complexity, context and collaboration from manufacturing software to creating a service relationship by Dave Snowden

Manufacturing practices abound at Agile conferences but is software something that comes of a production line (albeit in small batch sizes)? Should we instead think of software development as a service? Can we combine unarticulated customer needs with novel technology to shift the business forward rather than simply respond to demand? Should we see applications as emergent properties of complex interactions between people and software objects over time? What sort of ecosystem (rather than architecture) is needed for such an approach? Using the popular Cynefin framework as a starting point, its creator will explore these questions.

Let the Elephants Leave the Room: Tips for Making Development Life Leaner by Lemi Orhan Ergin

As developers, we often complain about the efficiency problems we face while working. We work hard but produce so little that our whole development life turns into a hamster wheel at some point. One of the biggest reason of such a common problem is working in waste. Waste is in everywhere, in our source code, in the office, in our processes and even in management. In this session, I will talk about the wastes and how we can remove to make our development life leaner.

Effective meetings in Agile teams by Denis Rudonja

In every company we have huge number of meetings happening every day. Some of them are efficient, some of them are not. This brings the need for meeting models which will enforce meeting efficient and help everyone in getting the best outcome possible. Having in mind that well-run meeting leads to positive results and increased productivity, we created 3 meeting models to meet this expectation. These models are just frame around which facilitators can add and adjust specific things in order to allow people to develop solutions on each other’s ideas and expands the creativity of the group. These models are stressing important parts of 3 most commonly used types of meetings in any company. By using points from these models, you will increase efficiency of the meeting and bigger satisfaction from participants.

From Agile Cat to Agile Tiger by Joey Flint and Maria Ball

Managing the delivery and daily operations for multiple complex projects responsible for the delivery of media that receives over 200 million play requests per month can be challenging at best. Imagine doing this and having your developer resource cut by a third!

Changing ways of working in a ‘mature’ agile team of 50+ can in some ways be more challenging than introducing agile for the first time to a team. Everyone has an opinion and thinks they know how to ‘be agile’. In this session we talk about how, over the course of a year, we challenged ways of working for an ever shrinking team responsible for delivering media that receives over 200 million play requests per month. Our aim was to improve predictability of delivery without compromising software quality. This was achieved whilst continuously rolling out improvements and new capabilities to our service as well as providing 24/7 support.

Effective meetings for distributed teams by Marcus Degerman

Our organizations get more and more global, and we spend more and more time in distributed meetings where some or all of the participants connect through a video-conferencing system. Bad connections and different time zones are just part of the problem. Not being able to see one another properly or having a shared whiteboard where we can think together makes it hard to have meetings that go beyond status updates. We have developed and experienced numerous methods during our work with multiple global organizations. During this seminar, I will share some of our best tips and methods for having good discussions and problem-solving sessions and make your distributed meetings more effective and fun.

Agile Development – Why requirements matter by Fariz Saracevic

The clear benefits of agile development is a better collaboration, incremental delivery, early error detection and the elimination of unnecessary work—have made it the default approach for many teams. Some developers have questioned whether requirements fall into the category of unnecessary work, and can be cut down or even completely eliminated. Meanwhile, teams developing complex products, systems and regulated IT continue to have requirements-driven legacy processes.

So how does requirements management fit in an agile world? This session will take a look at requirements management and how it can bring significant value to agile development in regulated IT and complex product development projects, and sets out the characteristics of an effective requirements management approach in an agile environment.

How to write effective requirements in an Agile environment by Matteo Taddei

Clear and Effective Requirements are a key component of any Product Development LifeCycle (PDLC). In Agile requirements are collected using User Stories; in this talk we will cover what a User Story is, and the major characteristics a User Story should have to be clear and effective for any team.

Better User Stories by Matteo Cavucci

One of the biggest challenges of making things together is actually to communicate to other people what is our idea. Considering that humans are not so good at telepathy, the only tool we have is language. For years, people struggled on collect requirements in big books that no-one want read, until we discovered another way: telling stories. This talk is taking something very familiar to many, the "user story" format, and will explore it from an unusual point of view. We're going to see how to use it, how to avoid common pitfalls and how to get the real sense of "user stories".

Workshop: User Story Mapping by Jason Jones

Am interactive session to create a User Story Map, a powerful visualization tool that helps draw out user centric product features that can then be easily sliced into outcome & value driven releases / road map.

Agile & Lean Movie Making by Utpal Chakraborty

"Lean & Agile Movie Making” is a fresh, new and innovative topic (an experience of a novice movie makers team on Lean & Agile) and most importantly it has got a completely new dimension of imparting Agile, Lean & Kanban LIKE best practices from Movie Industry to the IT or other world like we did the same a decade back from Automobile Industry (Toyota).

The session also reiterates the fact that Lean & Agile principles are not specific and limited for to any specific industry but the same can be applied to any industry and even in our day today work and get benefited.

Some of the learning outcome from the session are :

1. How some of the Lean & Agile Like (similar to Lean & Agile) best practices used in movie making for ages can be adopted in IT and vice versa. 

2. How Agile along with Six-Sigma Lean & Kanban can act as a Power Pack for cost cutting as well as excellence in production execution in movie making. 

3. Importance of special Tools and Techniques in movie making as well as in IT wherever there is a technical challenge or a creative constraint. 

5. Movie Production Envisioning vs. Agile Daily Scrum Meeting & backlog replenishment 

6. Movie Post-mortem vs. Agile Retrospective 

7. Film Budgeting vs. Agile Estimation

Agile Testing - Adding values to agile teams by Adisa Sinanovic and Amela Teftedarija

Is tester’s role on agile project same as the one on traditional project? What values testers add to agile teams? What are the problems most commonly encountered? Do testers need to know how to write code? Is automated testing key solution to all these problems? We'll try to answer these questions and explore some real examples from our projects and our testing community. 

Testers need to understand the values and principles that support agile projects, and how testers are an integral part of a whole-team approach together with developers and business representatives.

10 tips how to make your Scrum fail - or succeed if you want by Igor Parac

Scrum fails quite often. Sometimes it seems like people deliberately avoid to use it properly.

Let's investigate 10 common reasons why this happens. Let's see how teams fall in the trap by misusing or forgetting core agile principles. Also, let's talk about how to recognize, prevent and avoid common pitfalls when implementing Scrum in Agile environment.

Principles of continuous improvement and Agile retrospectives by Vedran Nikolic

 

Vedran will be talking about Principles of continuous Improvement, Agile retrospective essentials as well as best practices in hosting successful retrospective meetings.

Workshop: Building continuous improvement mindset with Improvement Theme by Jovan Vidic

Agile retrospectives have been very popular and widely accepted practice in today's software development. Many teams are trying to figure out ways how to find better ways to develop a software. On that journey many of them are left frustrated with retrospective process and outcomes. Having a retrospective after an iteration is the most commonly used approach by development teams. Unfortunately, very often this is not bringing desired results.

People are complaining that retrospective topics are too dependent on recent events and that there is not enough focus on important topics. What also happens very often is that the actions are agreed, but nothing is actually done in following iterations.

So, the question is what could we do to get everyone on same page?

One approach to this problem is to understand what is really needed to implement the change. Teams need to get rid off old and build new habits, more focused and experimental. Improvement Theme is a tool in the form of a poster created by Jimmy Janlén from Crisp. As author describes, it works as a conveyor belt for continuous improvements once the retrospective is over. The tool is modification of the Toyota Kata concept.

Improvement theme consists of five areas:

  1. Name of the Improvement Theme
  2. Now/Problem – Description of the current situation
  3. Definition of Awesome – How would we like it to be?
  4. Next Target Condition – X weeks from now, what has changed?
  5. First Steps – 3 slots for three post-its that describe the first (next) actions we will take?

In this workshop you are going to experience how it is to create improvement theme in a collaborative environment. You are also going to learn which questions to ask in each stage of the process and how to follow up after the theme is created.

Agile in a Bank: From Concept to Rollout by Marco Trincardi

Most of the banks in Italy are trying to move to Agile. As expected, it is a long journey to introduce an Agile mindset in a organization of this size and culture, a journey with a lot of pitfalls.

How to manage the change process in practice?

What difficulties are faced during the introduction of an empirical process in a control culture?

What’s needed to move from pilot phase to roll out and let Agile be an accepted methodology to run projects and business?

In this session, I will answer those questions (and many others), sharing my two years experience in introducing Agile in one of the most important Italian Bank.

Always ready for release by Bogdan Costea

Agility is not about following a process, it's about delivering on expectations and that's way easier when you have a good release pipeline that automates as much of the process as possible.

Being able to release and deploy to production at any time doesn't imply that you're going to do it, it just means you are ready to do it at any time, and who doesn't want that right?

The talk goes through the evolution of release automation starting with automated builds, unit testing, CI, continuous delivery and continuous deployment with lots of examples and a couple of demos (a setup for a complex Java enterprise app and a simple ruby Sinatra web app)

Unchaining the Analysts - making BDUF Scrum friendly by Amber Haley

Project managers, product owners and most people who are NOT developers struggle with defining a heavily technical solution... And business analysts of the traditional nature have this technical nous, but struggle to make the transition to using agile frameworks because of the lingering hangover of BDUF/BRUF. Simply adding a BA to your team will likely create more problems than solutions without re-engineering the need to know all the facts into something that fits "just enough and Just in time".

But it doesn't have to be this way.

In this case study based presentation I explore exact the exact methods we used to upskill a Business analyst or requirements engineer, and massage their skillset into a key role that can insure that quality, detail rich stories go into any agile process, while bridging the communication gap and bringing a wealth of "Big Picture" thinking to the bite sized chunks of Scrum development.

Prethodni događaji

Naše usluge

Kontaktirajte nas

Bosnia Agile
Milana Preloga 12, Sarajevo 71000
Bosna i Hercegovina

Ova adresa el. pošte je zaštićena od spambotova. Omogućite JavaScript da biste je vidjeli.
www.agile.ba